5 Security Tips for Your New Home

When you think of home security, you probably imagine expensive, intricate systems that cost more than you’re willing to shell out—especially after buying a new home.

But that’s not always the case. Good home security doesn’t require a pricey, state-of-the-art system. In many cases, small changes and habits are all you need to keep burglars at bay.

Keep these five security tips in mind as you move into your new home. They can save you from spending on an expensive system, while enjoying the same peace of mind.

  1. Fake cameras actually work. Fake security cameras sound funny—and ineffective—but don’t rule them out. Not only are they a fraction of the cost of an actual security camera, but, “Most fake security cameras have a noticeable blinking LED light that deters criminals at night when they’re most active,” according to home security experts. If the light stops blinking, just replace the batteries.

Purchase a few to place around the front and even rear entrances to your house to provide maximum protection. Don’t forget to pair them with “This home is protected by…” security stickers. These stickers can be purchased for less than $10 online. This makes your fake cameras seem even more real.

  1. Fewer windows=good move. Adding more windows to boost the amount of natural light into your home might look good, but they make your house a more attractive option for intruders. Nearly 30 percent of burglars gain access to a home through an unlocked door or window—and windows on the first floor are especially common targets. It’s easy to forgot to lock windows after opening them to get fresh air, and that can be a costly mistake. If your garage door has windows, tint them so intruders can’t see if you’re home or away. The same goes for your front door and first floor windows—invest in blinds and keep them closed for the best line of defense. You can also put a frosted coating on the lower half of your windows, which only lets outsiders see only through the top half. These come in peel and stick form, so you can make this update quickly and economically.
  2. Make your home look occupied. It’s become increasingly common for break-ins to occur during daylight hours, since most people are away at work, the kids are at school and the neighbors aren’t out and about to notice anything suspicious. Here are a few ways to make your home look more active during the day to deter potential burglars:

Have landscapers come at all different times of the day so there’s someone there in the morning, afternoon and evening. It will be harder for burglars to spot a pattern this way.

 

Keep lights on in the most visible rooms in the house. You can install a timer to have them turned on and off if you don’t want them on for eight hours straight.

 

Don’t let mail pile up while you’re away, which is a clear sign that no one is home. Ask a friend or neighbor to pick it up each morning and leave it in your home. This way, if anyone is watching, it appears as though people are checking in and going in and out of the home.

  1. Consider your landscaping. Believe it or not, your landscaping can deter criminals. People who are attempting to break into a house want somewhere to hide if the mailman drives up or a neighbor comes outside. If you have large trees or bushes planted along the first story of your house, it gives burglars a great place to wait it out.

Avoid this easy hideaway by keeping your landscaping simple, trimmed and polished. Plant bushes that are low to the ground and provide maximum protection—think rose bushes or citrus plants that have spiny leaves. Also consider using gravel instead of mulch so you can hear when someone approaches your home.

  1. Video doorbells are worth checking out. One new way to keep your home safe and deter your kids from opening the door to strangers is a video doorbell. More affordable than most security cameras, these easy-to-install gadgets provide on-demand video, a live view of your front porch at all times and motion detection alerts sent straight to your smartphone.

Several of the newer models allow two-way audio so you can communicate with anyone who rings your doorbell, even if you aren’t home. These are a great security feature if you have kids who open the door for strangers or if your door doesn’t have a peephole.

Original Article Here: 5 Security Tips for Your New Home

Related Video Here: Home Security Tips

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Home security tips for someone with dementia

October sees the annual launch of National Home Security Month (NHSM), a nationwide initiative aimed at raising awareness of home security. Hannah Adkins, Marketing Executive for NHSM’s headline sponsor Yale, gives us her five top tips on securing the home of someone with dementia.

 

  1. Lock it up

It sounds simple, but ensure door and window security is up to scratch. Doors and windows are the primary methods for burglars to enter and exit properties with 33% simply entering through an open front door*. Even changing the basics in home security can make a big difference and upgrading your locks is easy. Locks should comply with the British Standard BS3621 and cylinders should meet the TS007 3 star standard. Look for the British Kitemark symbol.

 

  1. Discourage burglars

There are a number of measures you can install to deter a burglar from considering your property as a potential target. CCTV systems, burglar alarms and outdoor lighting not only provide added security, notifying you to an intruder, they also act as a visual deterrent. In fact, 60% of burglaries attempted on houses with alarm systems failed. As technology evolves, these systems have become more sophisticated and can aid people with dementia. For example, integrated burglar alarms and CCTV systems can now send notifications and email alerts to a users smartphone when triggered. This is ideal, as they can be sent to a relative’s device so they can check on security and their family member’s safety.

 

  1. Go key free

As seen with the alarm and CCTV systems, new and developing technology can aid those living with dementia and make life that little bit easier. Smart locks are one such security measure that is doing just that. Smart locks, such as Yale’s Keyless connected smart lock, can be unlocked using a key card, keytag, remote fob or even a smartphone when connected to a smart home system. Pin codes can be set for certain times of the day and given to carers, relatives and house help, such as cleaners to let them into the property securely without having to get up and down, answering to unknown callers or losing keys.

 

  1. Eye spy

A threat when leaving vulnerable people home alone is distraction burglaries. This involves a trick or lie to get into a property either by posing as someone of authority or keeping you at the front door while someone accesses the property through a different entry point. Investing in a digital door viewer means that you can see who is at the door without compromising your home security.

 

  1. Play it safe

To protect small valuable items, use a home safe securely bolted to the floor or wall. This way, important information cannot be lost or discarded as well as preventing thieves from stealing personal belongings.

 

For more information and advice on home security visit Home security tips for someone with dementia.